The Day Two Lifelong Friends Met

It’s been so hectic with trying to buy a home before our unexpected lease expiration that there hasn’t been any writing happening. That just won’t do at all. So, this is me flexing my storytelling muscle before it cramps up on me.

With so much overload in my head already I thought I’d grab my Picadilly Write the Story book and see what I could come up with. I will also incorporate the theme of buying a home or moving into the story.


Photo by Anna Shvets on Pexels.com

The Day Two Lifelong Friends Met

  • plantain
  • possess
  • greenhouse
  • divine
  • fleet
  • culpable
  • premature
  • soulmate
  • lace
  • auspicious

“Granny Alberta, tell us the story about how you and Grandma Eileen met.”

“Oh now,” Alberta answered. “Eileen, you always tell it so much better than I could. She’s the real storyteller you know.”

The grandkids sat cross-legged on the bearskin rug tossed haphazardly on the floor of the cabin. They stared up wide-eyed with anticipation. Eileen and Alberta were seated on the plush couch.

The cabin was owned equally by both families. It was large and luxurious and was probably classified as glamping.

“The divine Himself is tired of hearing that silly old story. What would possess you to ask for that?” Eileen tittered.

“In a way, it’s the story of us,” piped in Genie, the eldest.

This made both women smile. She was an auspicious child, their Genie. She’d been premature, and they’d been afraid they would lose her. She’s a fighter and never lets anything stand in her way.

“Alright, just the short version then.” She began.

“I was a wild child, always running and playing in the dirt. My mother hated it. If she caught me outside she’d set me to work on the chores. Because of that, I was hiding out by the greenhouse and making some mud pies for my imaginary friends to eat.

This little girl in a white lace dress came bounding out of nowhere and snuck up behind me while I was digging up some plantain that had cropped up around the greenhouse.

‘Whatya doin?’ she’d asked.

‘Making some mud pies.’

‘Can I help?’

I told her that I wouldn’t be culpable for the mess that would be her dress when the pies were finished.”

“What’s culpable mean?” Little Jimmy asked.

“It means guilty, dummy,” Billy provided.

“Billy,” Alberta admonished.

“What?”

“Any more name calling and you’ll be excused.”

“But Granny.”

“But Granny nothing.”

“Where was I?” asked Eileen. “Ah yes, I wouldn’t be culpable for your dress, that’s right.”

“I told her that I was Eileen, and she told me her name was Alberta. We spent hours playing in the mud. Her beautiful white lace dress was a grayish brown by the time we were finished.

‘Where do you live?’ I thought to ask her as we were saying goodbye.

‘I moved in on the top of that hill over there.’

She’d pointed towards the old Henderson place, but the Hendersons didn’t live there anymore. From our spot down below, we could see a fleet of work vans parked in the driveway.

Alberta had promised to meet me again the next day. I’d thought for sure she’d be in trouble for ruining her beautiful dress. If it had been mine, my mother would have tanned my hide so good I wouldn’t-a sat down for a week.

She showed up that day and the next day and every day the weather permitted after that.”

“And sometimes when the weather didn’t permit, too,” Alberta teased.

Eileen’s eyes twinkled with memory.

“We were best friends and practically inseperable after that. Most people marry their soulmate, but I have been lucky enough to befriend mine. And even more lucky that my son grew up to marry her daughter and give us you four grandkids to love and adore together.”

“And that’s how we became one big family, right Grandma?” Serena added.

“Right” Eileen and Aleberta agreed in unison.


Check out Bear B & Stone’s moving woes when they meet the neighborhood bullies in Bully Troubles.

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